CDM AND A-CDM SYMPOSIUM
19-21 MARCH 2018
"Sustainable and efficient operations through
Collaborative Decision Making (CDM) and A-CDM"
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Programme

  • Principles of Collaborative Decision Making, Airport-CDM (A-CDM): A philosophy of open communication and exchange by airport stakeholders.
  • A-CDM collaboration levels.
  • Five important steps of the continuous process when implementing an A-CDM initiative.
  • Main benefits derived from an A-CDM initiative.
  • How ANSPs in Africa can implement CDM and A-CDM.
Allocated time Activity Designated person/speaker
08h00 - 09h00 Symposium Registration  
Session 1    
09h00 - 10h00 Opening Remarks
  • Thabani Mthiyane, Chair Africa CANSO CEO Committee (AFC3) and CEO, ATNS
  • Barry Kashambo, Regional Director, ESAF
  • Papa Atoumane, Director of Safety and Technical Services AFCAC
  • Sinethemba Mngqibisa, Acting Deputy Director-General, Civil Aviation DoT
Facilitator: Boni Dibate, Regional Director CANSO Africa
Session 2    
10h00 - 11h00 Report back on Uganda CDM workshop Josia Manyakoana, Senior Manager Operations South, ATNS
11h00 -11h30 Networking break  
Session 3    
11h30 - 12h30   Collaborative Decision Making (CDM), is about partners (airport operators, aircraft operators/ground handlers, ATC, the Network Operations dealing with Air Traffic Flow Management and other aviation stakeholders) working together more efficiently and transparently in the way they work and share data.

Airport CDM (A-CDM), aims to improve the overall efficiency of operations at an airport, with a focus on the aircraft turn-round and pre-departure sequencing process. One of the main outputs of the CDM process is more accurate Calculated Take-off Times which can be used to improve en route and sector planning of the ATM Network. The A-CDM concept aims at improving operational efficiency at airports by reducing delays, improving the predictability of events during the progress of a flight and optimising the utilisation of resources. With A-CDM the network is served also with more accurate take-off information to derive ATFM slots. The improved decision making by the A-CDM Partners is therefore facilitated by the sharing of accurate and timely information and by adapted operational procedures, automatic processes and user-friendly tools.
  • Arthur Bradshaw, Air Traffic Management Systems Advisor
  • Sandile Maphanga, Senior Manager ANS, SACAA
  • Stuart Ratcliffe, Co-chair of the CANSO ATFM WG, Metron Aviation
  • Lindi-Lee Kirkman, Manager, Safety& Flight Operations, IATA
Facilitator: Simon Zwane, Senior Manager: ATM Planning ATNS 
12h30 - 13h30 Lunch  
13h30 - 15h00 A-CDM process and benefits Focus group discussions

Session Facilitator: Stuart Ratcliffe, Co-chair of the CANSO ATFM WG, Metron Aviation

  Group 1 – Principles of CDM

The principle of CDM is to put in place agreed cross-collaborative processes including communication protocols, training, procedures, tools, regular meetings and information sharing, which moves ATM operations from stovepipe decision-making into a collaborative management process that improves overall system performance and benefits the individual stakeholders. This discussion introduces the broad scope of CDM and outlines its three main elements: en route, airside and landside. As airside CDM is the element to which ANSPs most contribute, it focuses on the main principles, applicable situations and expected benefits of this airside collaborative approach. 
Group Coordinator: TBC
Group Coordinator: Bradley Stalls, Manager AMC, ACSA
  Group 2 – A-CDM: A philosophy of open communication exchange 

Transparency and sharing information are fundamental principles of A-CDM. In this context, they are symbiotic; one cannot exist without the other. For a strong and effective collaborative process, stakeholders should understand and become comfortable with the central principle of transparency. As soon as the decision is made to implement A-CDM, agreed principles, processes, and data quality standards for a multi-directional information exchange should be agreed. The groundwork of agreeing to the principles and methods of sharing information and transparency is essential. It is vital to understand and promote that each stakeholder does not operate in isolation, and that each action has positive or negative consequences for the others, and for the system. Transparency allows stakeholders to make decisions based on a common situational awareness and take collaborative action that would be beyond the ability of any one stakeholder with incomplete and fragmented information.

Group Coordinator: Sanjeev Gareeb, Manager AMC 

  Group 3 – A-CDM stakeholders

The primary stakeholders of an A-CDM process and their roles must be considered and identified, as organisations can differ from one airport to another. In some cases, it may be that some of the stakeholders are the same, for example, some airports and airlines also provide ground handling. Various secondary stakeholders including regulators, military, local traffic providers, and local tourism agencies may need to be involved from the beginning or during an on-going A-CDM initiative depending on the objectives of the project, feedback received, or a change in the stakeholders' strategy during the project.

Group Coordinator: Dhipak Lalla, Manager CAMU, ATNS

  Group 4 – Main benefits derived from an A-CDM initiative

CDM aims at improving operational efficiency at airports by reducing delays, improving the predictability of events during the progress of a flight and optimising the utilisation of resources. With A-CDM the network is served also with more accurate take-off information to derive ATFM slots. The improved decision making by the A-CDM Partners is therefore facilitated by the sharing of accurate and timely information and by adapted operational procedures, automatic processes and user-friendly tools. As one of many results, organisations and individuals will start to consider the requirements of, and consequences to, the other stakeholders when deliberating their internal planning strategies and processes.

Group Coordinator: Luvo Sokatsha Specialist ATF, ATNS

15h00 - 15h30 Networking break  
Session 4    
15h30 - 17h00 Report back and discussions
  • Group 1 - Principles of CDM
  • Group 2 - A-CDM: A philosophy of open communication exchange 
  • Group 3 - A-CDM stakeholders 
  • Group 4 - Main benefits derived of an A-CDM initiative
Facilitator: Sandile Maphanga, Senior Manager ANS,SACAA 
17h00 - 17h30 Closing/Summary of the day   
  • Barry Kashamabo, Regional Director, ICAO ESAF 
  • Stuart Ratcliffe, Co-chair of the CANSO ATFM WG, Metron Aviation 
 
19h00 - 22h00 Welcome Cocktail
Venue: Gateway Hotel - Rooftop
 
Allocated time Activity Designated person/speaker
Session 1    
09h00 - 10h30 Implementation
Airport Collaborative Decision Making (A-CDM) is now embedded in the ATM operational concept as an important enabler that will improve operational efficiency, predictability and punctuality to the ATM network and airport stakeholders. It is expected that A-CDM will have an impact on the operating efficiency of airport partners and may eventually contribute to reduced buffer times for resource planning and flight times due to enhanced predictability. It is recognised that the implementation of A-CDM will transform many of the communication policies and procedures that have historically dominated the airport operations environment, bringing substantial improvements to all partners. A-CDM is implemented in the airport environment through the introduction of processes which realise the aims of the concept elements.
  • Tanja Grobotek, Regional Director, IATA
  • Arthemon Ndikumana, Regional Officer AGA, ESAF
  • Gaborekwe Khambule, SM Aviation Met Services, SAWS
Facilitator: Josia Manyakoana, Senior Manager Operations South, ATNS
10h30 - 11h00 Networking break  
Session 2    
11h00 - 12h30   Focus group discussions Facilitator: Rafael Quezada, Operations Programme Manager, CANSO 
  Group 1 – Airport-CDM collaboration levels

There is no 'one-size-fits-all' A-CDM process or toolset that can be bought off-the-shelf and implemented ready-to-use. ANSPs, airports and airlines differ in terms of size, strategy, status, constraints, and business models, and each of these differences may require a different form or level of airside A-CDM. Implementation is shaped by the benefits sought by the stakeholders and involves various levels of collaboration and sharing information.
Level 1: Define a common understanding and data sharing. 
Level 2: Share advanced information. 
Level 3: Share operational decisions. The stakeholders agree to share their respective decisions or intended actions. 
Level 4: Share analysis. Based on the analysis and respective decisions, the stakeholders agree to collaborative cross-organisational decisions. 
Level 5: Connect to the other elements of CDM. 
Group Coordinator: Thulile Ndelu, Manager ATS, ATNS
  Group 2 – Steps to success   

The fundamental phases that need to be considered when implementing A-CDM include:
  • The information phase – getting buy-in from all stakeholders and partners
  • The analysis phase – doing a gap analysis on the current environment
  • The Cost-Benefit Analysis – creating an in-depth understanding of expected benefits
  • The implementation phase – a bottom-up process for operational readiness
  • The validation and operation phase – a pre-requisite to qualify for operational evaluation tests. 
Group Coordinator: Bradley Stalls, Manager AMC, ACSA
  Group 3 –Airport-CDM expansion in Africa 

Through its capacity optimisation, A-CDM helps in solving issues by bringing more predictability and efficiency. Predictability is improved by sharing general and constraint-related information in a timely manner. The stakeholders have a better and more aligned understanding of the situation as well as current and forecasted capacity issues. It allows stakeholders to individually and collectively plan scenarios and to develop new processes, procedures, and solutions, not only as a response to a crisis, but proactively before it even occurs. Regional CDM and more focus on A-CDM would greatly enhance aviation performance. Furthermore, an A-CDM process that is integrated with a Network Management (or ATFM) system, will provide more accurate estimated departure times that will help to minimise loss of airspace slots in congested or otherwise constrained airspace.
Group Coordinator:Stuart Ratcliffe, Co-chair of the CANSO ATFM WG, Metron Aviation 
  Group 4 – The Silo effect – slowing down operational efficiency at airports 

Airport stakeholders often operate independent systems in isolation, focusing on their own outcomes and without a shared situational awareness across the wider airport community. This limited perspective on the operation as a whole can result in widespread inefficiencies. Often, there are no recognised processes or agreements bringing all stakeholders together regularly. This denies stakeholders an opportunity to share their difficulties and successes with other members of the airport community. In addition, a lack of process makes it difficult to ensure that relevant information is shared with concerned stakeholders in a timely manner. This discussion will describe common information stovepipes at airports where information traverses through levels of a hierarchy efficiently but does not disperse widely, and why airport stakeholders should minimise these to progress in addressing their current and future operational and organisational challenges.
Group Coordinator:Luvo Sokatsha, Specialist ATF, ATNS 
12h30 - 13h30 Lunch  
Session 3    
13h30 - 15h00 Report back and discussions
  • A-CDM collaboration levels
  • Steps to success
  • A-CDM expansion in Africa
  • The Silo effect – slowing down operational efficiency at airports
Facilitator: Sandile Maphanga, Senior Manager ANS, SACAA 
15h00 - 15h30 Networking break  
Session 4    
15h30 - 16h00 Commitment from groups
  • A-CDM collaboration levels
  • Steps to success
  • A-CDM expansion in Africa
  • The Silo effect – slowing down operational efficiency at airports 
Facilitator: Arthur Bradshaw, Air Traffic Management Systems Advisor
Session 5    
16h00 - 16h30 Conclusions and recommendations
  • Barry Kashambo, Regional Director, ESAF
 
Session 6    
16h30 - 17h00 Summary of the day 
  • Stuart Ratcliffe, Co-chair of the CANSO ATFM WG, Metron Aviation 
 
19h00 - 22h00 Gala dinner
Venue: TBC
 
Allocated time Activity Designated person/speaker
Session 1    
09h00 - 10h00 Topic: Impact of CDM and A-CDM on Safety
  • Barry Kashambo, Regional Director, ESAF
  • Hein Reid, Senior Manager Operations North, ATNS
  • Silas Silas, Director ANS CAAB
  • Sandile Maphanga, Senior Manager ANS, SACAA
Facilitator: Simon Zwane, Senior Manager: ATM Planning ATNS 
10h30 - 11h00 Networking break  
Session 2    
11h00 - 11h15   Promoting the Global Benchmarking Work Group (GBWG)
  • Sibusiso Nkabinde, HASAR/Manager: Air Traffic Services, ATNS 
 

11h15 - 12h30

Summary and closing remarks
  • Boni Dibate, Regional Director CANSO Africa
 
12h30 Lunch